Tag Archives: financial loss

Insurance Riders

Insurance Riders

You’ve worked out how much life insurance you need.   A collection of life insurance policy add-ons, called Insurance riders, must be considered. Insurance Riders can give policyholders additional benefits.

They increase peace of mind, that if something goes wrong, there is a Plan B.  When you buy life insurance, available Insurance riders vary by insurance company.   Costs also vary and depend on many factors, including your age, health and type of policy.

1.  Waiver of Premium Insurance Rider:

A waiver of premium rider usually associated with life assurance may be inserted into a policy at an extra cost.  The policyholder must have been disabled for a specific period, for example, six months.  Other requirements may be necessary such as the state of health of the policyholder and must be below a certain age.

2.  Disability Income Insurance Rider:

This is one of the most common riders and one that may be particularly important to younger policyholders (typically, those under 40).

This rider generally cannot be added after you reach age 45, although some insurers make it available through age 50. (https://us.axa.com/insurance/disability-income/insurance-riders.html) You collect a regular income from the insurance company if you become totally disabled and can’t work.  The policy specifies the amount of the income and whether it’s paid for a certain amount of time or for the length of the disability.  Some disability income riders pay out only if you become disabled from an accident while others pay on accident and sickness.

3.  Guaranteed Insurability Insurance Rider:

This rider provides specific dates on which additional life insurance policies can be bought.  Usually, the older the insured gets, the fewer dates the policy owner has to purchase more life insurance. (http://www.lifeinsurancewiz.com/LifeInsurance/LearningCenter/guaranteed.htm) This rider lets you purchase additional life insurance at a later date without undergoing a medical exam or providing any evidence

This rider lets you purchase additional life insurance at a later date without undergoing a medical exam or providing any evidence of your insurability.  Because you never know how your health could change, it makes sense to consider this rider.

4.  Term Conversion Insurance Rider:

Provides coverage for a certain period of time, such as 10, 15 or 20 years.  Permanent life insurance, such as whole life or universal life, provides coverage for your entire life, so your beneficiary receives a benefit no matter when you die.

This insurance rider lets you convert term life insurance into permanent life insurance without undergoing a medical exam.  It is especially attractive to young people starting careers and families who need life insurance but don’t have enough money yet to secure all the coverage with permanent life insurance, which has higher premiums than term life. There will be a deadline for when you must

There will be a deadline for when you must convert if you want to change the term policy to permanent life insurance without providing health information.  Understand the convertibility features before you buy.

5.  Accelerated Death Benefit Insurance Rider:

Accelerated Death Benefit Rider has become standard in the insurance industry and is usually included automatically for free or offered at nominal cost.  The rider lets you collect a portion of the policy’s death benefit if you become terminally ill with a short life expectancy, such as one year.  The policy spells out how much of the death benefit is available before death.  Usually its capped at $250 000 to $500 000.  You can use the proceeds for anything, such as paying medical bills or living expenses.  Even though the insurer offers the rider free, the company may charge a fee if it is exercised.

6.  Critical Illness Insurance Rider:

A rider added to a life insurance policy to protect the insured against financial loss in the event of a terminal illness.

The insurer pays a lump sum if you’re diagnosed with any of the critical illnesses specified in the insurance policy, such as cancer, heart attack, coronary artery bypass, major organ transplant, stroke, kidney failure. (http://www.moneycontrol.com/glossary/insurance/critical-illness-rider_333.html).   Instead of reimbursing you for medical expenses, the way health insurance does, the rider provides money to use for any purpose during the course of the treatment.

Instead of reimbursing you for medical expenses, the way health insurance does, the rider provides money to use for any purpose during the course of the treatment.

7.  Child Protection Insurance Rider:

No one wants to consider the possibility of losing a child, so all emotion must be set aside when considering a child protection rider.  Although the death of a child typically would not result in income loss, as would the death of a spouse, the tragedy still would have financial consequences which could be an additional hardship for a bereaved family.  This term life insurance rider provides coverage for final expenses in case the unthinkable happens.  The coverage generally can be purchased in units –  for example $1000.  Basic information about the child’s health is required for underwriting.

 This term life insurance rider provides coverage for final expenses in case the unthinkable happens.  The coverage generally can be purchased in units –  for example $1000.  Basic information about the child’s health is required for underwriting.

8.  Accidental Death Benefit Insurance Rider:

If you die from an accident, this rider provides an additional benefit on top of the policy’s regular death benefit. The option is often referred to as double indemnity when the additional payout equals the original death benefit.  Sometimes the rider also includes additional payment for dismemberment.  You would collect money if you lost a limb or your sight.  Life insurers will consider your occupation and hobbies when determining premiums.

9.  Return of Premium Insurance Rider:

If you live to the end of the term, in exchange for paying the premium, in most circumstances you get all your money back. Some companies use a separate rider where others, like ING, write the return of premiums benefit into a basic policy.  You pay a higher premium for the opportunity to get your money back.  The big question to consider.  How does paying the extra cost for the return of premium rider compare to investing that money and buying a basic term policy instead? To find the answer, subtract the annual premium for a basic term policy from the annual cost of a return of premium policy.  The difference is how much you would have to invest each year during the insurance term.  Then calculate what annual rate of return you’d need on that money to beat the amount you’d get back from a return-of-premium policy.

Conclusion:

There is no one-size- fits- all answer to whether any of these Insurance riders are right for you.  You’ll need to weigh policy options to find the best package for your needs. (http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2011/05/25/useful-life-insurance-riders/)

Remember – money from the return of premiums is tax-free, but your own investment returns are taxed.  In some cases (depending on age, sex, tax bracket and other factors), you’d need to get more than a 7% rate of return on your investment to beat the return of premium policy

Key Person Insurance

Key Person insurance is an insurance policy taken out and paid for by a business which is then able to recoup any financial losses suffered, which may arise due to the death or extended inability of an important member of that business to perform his/her duties. Also known as trauma insurance, it is a standard life insurance policy which protects the business. Should a person who is an income generator die or become incapacitated, then with this cover, the business is compensated by means of a fixed monetary sum specified in the policy, which sum facilitates the continuity of the enterprise. The term of the policy does not extend beyond the usefulness of the individual whose knowledge, creativity and/or skills are critical to the viability or growth of an organisation, and whose loss may cripple it. The compensation amount may go towards financing the search for and training of a successor. (Source: Wikipedia)

Martha Stewart is the founder of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. In 2004 Stewart was convicted of charges related to the ImClone insider trading affair. When Stewart was indicted, she stepped down as CEO and Chairwoman of MSLO. Following her release from prison in March 2005, Stewart launched a much-publicized comeback. Some huge corporations have the luxury of having a key person to take charge during a severe but non-threatening illness, such as a non-fatal heart attack. When Roger Deromedi, CEO of Kraft Foods was hospitalised for a severe viral infection, the company’s chairman, Louis Camilleri took temporary charge, with no adverse effects to the company. Robert Robins, a professor emeritus at Tulane University said that a determining factor in planning for key personnel disability issues is the CEO’s personality and work style: is he willing to work with the board and senior management on a transition basis, even if an illness is not terminal but merely prevents him from performing his duties. The end of a career is the same as the end of life to some company leaders. Capitulation will be resisted in every way possible. When a CEO has a hands-on rather than a delegatory style, the situation is much worse. Founder and CEO of Intel, Andy Grove was able to carry on during treatment for life-threatening prostate cancer. He left the company at a time that was suitable to him and the corporation. He was later diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease.

At SouthWest Airlines, shareholders’ questions about 69 year old Herbert Kelleher’s prostate cancer resulted in his relinquishing his interim presidency and CEO position in 2001, although he retained his chairmanship of the board. In today’s competitive business environment, protecting the value of a star executive is critical. Using markets once reserved for elite athletes and entertainers, carriers such as Lloyds of London have developed products designed to protect a company’s most critical assets. These carriers have the ability to deliver disability benefits up to $100 million for the loss of an individual whose vision, knowledge and experience are critical to a company’s operation and future. Why do so many risk managers ignore this exposure? The due diligence needed to secure life and disability coverage is not part of a risk manager’s culture. They may feel awkward going to the boss and telling him that he may be putting the company at risk because of his lifestyle or his health. It involves personal information and health issues and has the added risk of opening secret doors and having unpleasant news revealed. Fewer than 35% of the corporations that secure key person life insurance, secure the corresponding key person disability coverage.

Obviously there are daredevils like Richard Branson and risk managers are aware of his activities. It is far more likely a key person will succumb to a stroke or cancer or hit by a car, than is that they will be disabled or killed while sky-diving over the Pyrenees. International travel can be hazardous though. In a recent situation, a private equity firm made a significant investment in a defence contractor. Shortly after the investment closed, the company named a new CEO. With hundred of millions of dollars at stake, the private equity firm sought to hedge their investment by acquiring $50 million key person life and disability insurance. As of the day of the request, the insurance adviser had eight business days to secure the insurance before the CEO departed for the middle east, with stops in hotspots such as Iraq and Afghanistan. As a result of the abbreviated time frame, traditional life and disability insurance was not an option. The adviser needed to turn to a speciality underwriter that deals with exceptionally large and complex risks. Within 72 hours, a policy was issued that covered the private equity firm’s loss of the CEO due to an accidental death or disability, as well as a result of acts of war or terrorism. The premium was for $50 million insurance and cost $62,500, covering a 2 week period. Sickness cover was included for certain elements of the insurance policy. Few domestic life and disability insurance carriers possess the ability to underwrite high risk exposures to the world’s hot zones. Unfortunately, many times, risk managers and their insurance advisors do not look beyond traditional channels to secure the needed key person disability coverage for their clients, partly because the cost of key person disability coverage is far greater than the cost of term life coverage. However, the risk is proportionally greater . The impact top CEOs and corporate leaders have on the success of their businesses is almost unfathomable. If you think about how many companies are dependent on one or two individuals, risk managers may need to re-examine how they insure human capital risk.